The Little Book of Hygge by Meik Wiking (2017)

The Little Book of Hygge: Danish Secrets to Happy Living

Hygge Manifest2

“Hygge has been called everything from ‘the art of creating intimacy,’ ‘coziness of the soul,’ ‘the absence of annoyance,’ ‘taking pleasure from the presence of soothing things’ or ‘cozy togetherness.'” Hygge is about an atmosphere and an experience, rather than about things. It is about being with the people we love. A feeling of home. A feeling that we are safe, that we are shielded from the world and allowed to let our guard down.” vi

This book, and the Danish lifestyle it describes, have become very popular in America lately. Hygge is the idea that creating a simple, cozy, warm home and opening it up to friends for simple celebrations is the secret to Danish happiness. Hygge is theory of living that encourages you to create a celebratory atmosphere all the time with a few simple “ingredients” — candles, low lighting, perhaps a fire, cozy clothes, delicious food, simple and inexpensive entertainment, and the company of people who make you happy.  And then, once all those things are in place, you take a moment to be thankful for all you have and enjoy your life, just as it is.

Wiking offers up few hard and fast rules for what it takes to create a truly Hygge environment. He does point to some ideas for people to try as they try to try out a Hygge lifestyle: candles and a fire for sure, good food jointly prepared, indulgent pleasures ready to be served up, cozy clothes, simple entertainment (think books, music, or games), and blankets, and no electronics allowed. Most important of all…loved ones! Friends and family, he points out, are the ultimate secret to happiness and offering them a cozy, relaxed placed to hang out without expectations or pretension is ideal for strengthening bonds and building happy memories.

Hygge, is not simply about about creating an atmosphere of cozy relaxation, but also about celebrating not doing, but rather being and enjoying. Americans feel an overwhelming compulsion to be busy every single moment of their — and their children’s — lives. Errands, sports, play-dates, outings, day trips…hardly anyone I know sees the value in spending time at home doing nothing; boredom is unheard of. In fact, I know very few children outside of my own, who can spend an entire rainy day on the couch, reading, napping, or doing art projects. We all are responsible for our own entertainment, and we all agree to do our own quiet thing, but all together. Usually, a decadent meal is simmering or roasting away in the kitchen; candles are always burning; and music is sometimes playing in the background.

A major component of Hygge is embracing, not resisting, the cold and wet weather. There seems to be a innate understanding among Northern Europeans that — while winter has its draw backs — it also presents a unique opportunity to create an indoor environment is the antidote to the outdoors: warm, cozy, dry, and lit by candles and a fire. Winter is a time for reading, napping, catching up with creative projects, and spending time with your loved ones. A winter celebrated and embraced, Hygge-style, offers a chance for everyone to restore and replenish themselves so that come summer, we are refreshed and ready to conquer the season.

I am proud to say that — before it was trendy — my husband and I embraced the Hygge ideals. We have always been unapologetic about relaxing at home; we have always tried to encourage our friends to come over at the last minute, just as they are (this is harder than you might think!); and celebrating the winter months as a time to hunker down and enjoy each other…because we know come summer, we will be busy enjoying sunshine, swimming, vacations, beaches, and relaxing by the pool.  Fall and winter are the months we use to recharge our batteries for the busy months ahead.

A fun book that brings some European ideas to an American audience…in my opinion, we could all use a bit of Hygge.

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